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Schoening Digital leverages a diverse and solidly creative team to bring digital solutions to life – the kind of solutions that are custom visualized and uniquely crafted to fit your needs. Actually.

Whether it’s marketing revitalization in the form of a site re-design, creative strategy and execution around new digital marketing channels or introducing the world to a new digital expression of your brand’s story – we’re on it.

Check in with us about a la carte solutions – we’d love to work with your team – or bring us on board for the whole enchilada. We’re based in Seattle, but we like where you’re from too.

WE ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT:

cohesion
cohesion
honesty
honesty
being fresh
being fresh
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goals
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mountains
experience
experience
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Never Eat Alone: and other secrets to success, one relationship at a time

Schoening Digital prides itself on building and maintaining strong relationships. Whether working on a project for a friend or new connection, Schoening Digital’s team always strives to make the client’s experience awesome. One way of ensuring this is creating a bond with the client that not only makes the project run smoothly, but also so that it continues to flourish. Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone, approaches the over-examined topic of networking with a simple and fresh perspective. Ferrazzi’s idea of networking is not about becoming the alpha “networker” in the room, throwing business cards willy-nilly, or attending networking conferences. Ferrazzi’s philosophy is about building a network one relationship at a time. It may seem that building an entire network one relationship at a time is slow and time-consuming, but Ferrazzi's approach is extremely efficient. The title of his book illustrates how efficient he aims to be: never eating alone. Why not strive to constantly meet new faces, check in with employees, or combine engagements with people of similar interests. Instead of feeling burnt out and needing to "clone" himself to get all his work done, he "clones the event," by including others and effectively killing two birds with one stone. "You have to work hard to be successful at reaching out to others, but that doesn't mean you have to work long" Ferrazzi writes, "I'm constantly looking to include others  in whatever I'm doing. It's good for them, good for me, and good for everyone to broaden their circle of friends."Ferrazzi has built his relationships over engagements such as these: Share a ride to the airport with an employee. Meet for fifteen minutes and a cup of coffee. Share a workout or hobby (golf, chess, book club). Have a quick early breakfast, lunch, or drinks after work. Invite someone to a special event (concert, book-signing party, or to the theater). Entertain at home and invite 1-2 people you don't know very well. Have them leave with a whole new set of friends. His methods have led him to bypass gatekeepers, rise above rejection, grow a robust network, and lead several successful businesses. One of the most refreshing ideas that stems from Ferrazzi’s book and philosophy is his emphasis on generosity. He acknowledges the amount of generosity that was given to him throughout his life and approaches each new relationship as an opportunity to give, not get. All of the sudden, networking is no longer about how many contacts you have in your phone book, but how many meaningful relationships you’ve made by giving your time, energy, and thought to others. The latter is guaranteed to yield more success and substance. Schoening Digital incorporates these values into our brand and relationships. Read more about our Founder's 9 Networking Tips to Skyrocket your network, and the importance Schoening Digital puts on relationships. Never Eat Alone is full of other inspirational and practical ideas and Ferrazzi’s site offers free resources too. Thank you Keith Ferrazzi for bringing a fresh and genuine perspective to networking!

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The "You're fired" mentor list: surrounding yourself with smart supporters

There is a particular chapter in Sheryl Sandberg's book Lean In titled "Will you be my mentor?" It is this chapter that has inspired me to invite you into a conversation about mentorship. Who are the first people you would call if you were fired? I keep a post-it note on my desk with seven names on it. It was written about half a year ago, after I read an article encouraging folks to keep in touch with who they consider to be their real life mentors. The author asks you, his reader, to jot down the names of the first people you would call if you were fired. As a business owner I don't happen to have a boss with that kind of power, but I sure as heck resonated with the idea of being in close touch with my support system. Either way this request is a wake up call: make sure you maintain a good relationship with the people you would rely on in a professional crisis (and in a personal crisis, for that matter). Schoening Digital is founded on informational interviews, otherwise known as networking On July 11th, 2012, when I sat down at my in-laws dining room table and wrote my first email as Schoening Digital's Founder, it was to a mentor of mine who had started his own business years earlier. I asked for five names from him. I thought I was embarking on a series of informational interviews in order to learn from seasoned business owners about the roadblocks, unexpected challenges, and lessons learned as I was setting out to start my own business. It turns out that that's called networking; I had never networked before (check out my learning on the subject in another post, 9 Networking Tips to Skyrocket Your Network).  My question-asking hasn't slowed down in the least and of course, taking this approach when its come to challenges, unknown territory, and new opportunities has been hugely defining for Schoening Digital. Reaching out to mentors during business challenges; learn from those who've done it before you As of three days ago, I've now run into two more serious business challenges, the kind that feel importantly heavy on your chest. You can tell because you forget to eat breakfast and lunch the day they surface, and don't even reach for the chocolate that's waiting to be snacked on. I so badly wanted to manage them with extreme care, knowing that there would be a lot of learning from them. So what do I do? I pick up the phone and get short-notice coffees on the calendar with seasoned business owners, mentors, and peers who might have experienced something similar. I wrote more about this in a blog post called 5 Ways to Leave Work Fears at the Door. There are these people whom I've met along the way that actually care about me, who lean into conversations about what they'd do differently, who send knowing smiles across tables and share advice like they have all of the time in the world. It's incredible. No matter what how well Schoening Digital is doing, these people have made me rich. It turns out that you never go into 'battle' in business, it's about being on the same side When you're going into battle, you feel as though you have an army of like-minded, like-souled people behind you and instead of one person's short life experience, you have decades and decades of business experience and perspective backing you up. And then you also have the wealth that comes with your army telling you that it's not a war to fight after all. There's no battle. It's about aligning expectations from a view point of success for everyone involved. That's called conversation. This huge insight came in the form of a short-notice caramel latte conversation with a close friend and mentor of mine. After I finished explaining the challenge I was confronting, about which this short-notice counseling meeting was called, the first thing she said was that I needed to change my wording. I needed to approach this situation from the same side of the table as my client; we are never actually on opposite sides of the table from each other. If that concept hasn't sunk in yet, let it; that can change the entire way that a business is run (and it has). Go ahead, write down that list of mentors. And then treat them each to a meaningful Hello. Get your You're Fired mentor list written down. Call up those whom you haven't spoken with in six months or longer. Email those whom you haven't seen in a month. Care about them. Ask them questions. Make sure you follow-up with them with an update about the things you talked about. Set-up of coffee meetings and treat your valued teammates - because that's what they are - to something with caramel in it. And then follow-up again. Photo shared from our Xakary the Magician shoot. 

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5 smart branding habits you can learn from food trucks

The holiday season is fast approaching and with it comes a lot of talk about food! In Seattle and cities alike, people love the convenience and quality of gourmet food trucks. You may not expect to find fresh pulled pork and rich grilled cheese sandwiches off the street, but these are food truck staple items that appear on nearly every menu. So, if everyone is serving a similar menu, how do food trucks make themselves stand out? Here are 5 main ingredients that attribute to the success of popular food trucks: An eye-catching exterior. Whether it's the use of bright colors or a building a unique industrial design, adding some personality to the exterior of the truck always attracts attention right off the bat. For example, the mobile pig from Maximus/Minimus immediately catches the attention of passersby eager for a delicious pulled pork sandwich. Informative messages. Being transparent is the key to success for food trucks. They must tell their customers exactly where to find them on any given day. Similarly, all businesses must communicate to their audience and provide opportunities for people to engage with the brand. Game-changing good service. As I mentioned, there are numerous grilled cheese sandwiches out there, so why would you buy one from a particular food truck? Personally, trying a delicious sandwich from a place that has great service is a done deal. I wouldn't even consider going to another place the next time I craved comfort food. Secret sauce(s). A traditional cheddar cheese on buttery bread is delicious, but by adding some creativity, your sandwich might just become irresistible. Looking at the menu from The Grilled Cheese Experience, I already want to try some spicy lamb sausage, sun dried tomato, and blackberry balsamic reduction in my grilled cheese sandwich. Create your own secret sauces that people can't resist. An unforgettable personality. To have a strong brand, you need to know your own added value. Have a personality and stick to it. The food truck Now Make Me A Sandwich is hilarious! Their menu includes items such as "Thanksgetting", "Buddha Call", and "Beastie." Just by looking at their menu, I already want to try them all! Next time you see a food truck, take note of the details they have included in their brand. Does the truck have a unique design? Does it make you want to stop and take a second look? Does it make you want to return over and over again? You might be inspired by these food trucks to be more colorful, original, and unexpected with your brand too. Photos shared from our Northwest Mobile Kitchens shoot featuring food trucks Monte Cristo, My Chef Lynn, and Now Make Me a Sandwich

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